Actual date of Candlemas (Imbolc)?

Annabelle

It always seems to me as if contemporary pagan holidays are never quite agreed upon, in terms of calendar date.

I say this because I have online friends wishing me a Blessed Imbolc (I always think of it as Candlemas, but that's beside the point), but I thought it was on February 2nd, which would be tomorrow, rather than February 1st (today).

Those of you who celebrate this holiday, what date do you have it on, and do you have any special reason why you chose one date over the other?
 

Zephyros

I don't know anything about the holiday, but it may have something to do with the different ways days are counted. The lunar calendar counts days from sunset to sunset, so what we would call evening is actually "tomorrow." For example, Christmas Eve and Day are perhaps a remnant of this.
 

Annabelle

Very true, closraprexa. I hadn't thought about that, but indeed, that could account for some differences in dates.
 

gregory

I'm with you, Annabelle. Feb 2 is the day.

However I have just found several Wiccan and Pagan sites that say it's today. And several more that say it's tomorrow :D

Celebrate twice ? :D

I like this listing:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/tools/calendar/faith.shtml?pagan

But Britannica says:

Imbolc, also called Oimelc , (Middle Irish, probably literally, “milking”), ancient Celtic religious festival, celebrated on February 1 to mark the beginning of spring. The festival apparently was a feast of purification for farmers and has been compared to the Roman lustrations. Imbolc was associated with the goddess Brigid, and after the Christianization of Europe the day of the festival became the feast day of St. Brigit.
 

Winterchild

In the North traditionally Candlemass is 2nd the same as Lammas over here, but this year Lammas actually falls on Feb 4th and so in Europe Imbolc would be the night of the 3rd, but some people go by traditional rather than actual dates.

Hope this makes sense greggors!
 

ravenest

In the North traditionally Candlemass is 2nd the same as Lammas over here, but this year Lammas actually falls on Feb 4th and so in Europe Imbolc would be the night of the 3rd, but some people go by traditional rather than actual dates.

Hope this makes sense greggors!

How did you come to the 'actual' date of the 4th ?


I thought that traditionally it was related to the lunar calendar and the Moon phase.

(Some may have noticed that spring comes 'late' some years and 'early' other years - in the solar calendar. Our solar calendar is used for dynamics other than an accurate measure of the processes in terrestrial nature - vegetatative and animal life and cycles are closely related to the numerous cycles of the Moon - traditionally, on 'bad Moon days' , no agriculture was done. I used to track those days on the Antipodean calendar, but I have not done it for a couple of years - numerous 'bad ' days often correlated to some natural disaster somewhere - usually near the equator - the giant tsunami in Indonesia matched with it perfectly)

I wonder what phase it is was in yesterday ? ;

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-25999333
 

danieljuk

Happy Imbolc everyone! I am doing it early to hit all possible dates, I am choosing 2nd of Feb for myself :) :thumbsup: :party:
 

Winterchild

I usually use this site to put the dates in my calendar each year:

http://www.archaeoastronomy.com/2014.html

I believe they get it as the midway point between the summer solstice and autumn equinox.
Often it is taken as the nearest Sunday, which in the Southern Hemisphere would be today, but the exact times are observed by some. I think if the intention is there then the actual exact timing matters not.

winterchild


How did you come to the 'actual' date of the 4th ?
 

zhan.thay

The 4th of February is exactly between December solstice 2013 and March equinox 2014.
 

firecatpickles

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