what is a witch to you

Morwenna

Do you HAVE to wear jeans?? I haven't bought a pair in years; if I can't wear them to work, why bother? But casual slacks are fine. :D I probably have way too many pairs, but I wear them out at the cuffs, and they fade.

Anyway, I warded our home back when we moved in, with the help of 3 friends, and I refresh it every day, at least verbally. I've extended it to our car and to the 3 storage bins. And to our sources of income. :)

But I've been very remiss in meditation. I've had some wonderful shamanic journeys, but they were always guided by others. I don't have ready access to that kind of interaction, more's the pity. :(

But I still like to think of myself as a witch. :) Not all witches are Wiccan!
 

celticnoodle

Do you HAVE to wear jeans?? I haven't bought a pair in years; if I can't wear them to work, why bother? But casual slacks are fine. :D I probably have way too many pairs, but I wear them out at the cuffs, and they fade.

I would say no, of course not! Though I do tend to live in my jeans and I have many pairs. However, lately, I've also begun to wear my more casual dress pants. Mainly because I cleaned out my closets recently and have so many and thought it such a shame that I own them and rarely wear them.
Anyway, I warded our home back when we moved in, with the help of 3 friends, and I refresh it every day, at least verbally. I've extended it to our car and to the 3 storage bins. And to our sources of income. :)
this is a good idea to do daily. I do something similar too, but don't remember to do it on a daily basis, I don't think. Good idea!

But I've been very remiss in meditation. I've had some wonderful shamanic journeys, but they were always guided by others. I don't have ready access to that kind of interaction, more's the pity. :(

But I still like to think of myself as a witch. :) Not all witches are Wiccan!
Well in my book then, if you like to think of yourself as a witch, YOU ARE ONE! :D

I never really thought of myself as a witch or anything special tbh. I just am what/who I am. However, after reading this thread, which I am thoroughly enjoying!---I have been thinking more about it. I guess I could consider myself a witch too.

For years now, I have been trying to write down all of my experiences and all the special things I know of--such as natural health remedies and the like (much of like everyone has shared here) in a journal for my grandchildren. Much of it is becoming a lost art and much of what I know I've learned from my mother and grandmother and they learned from theirs. I've also picked up much more along the way--specifically here. I want to pass it on to the kids, so I guess it also makes me a 'witch' and those journals are my "spells" for a Healthy, magical life! :laugh: I wonder if the kids will think of it as that when they receive it? (I plan to give it to them when they are about 18-21, or perhaps when they move out of their parents home for the first time).

WELCOME TO THE WITCH CLUB, MORWENNA!!! :D
 

suk

This is interesting, I play with the idea of describing myself as a witch, but hesitate a lot. I'm a lot more introspective, I don't do much ritual. I do use herbs and crystals and talk to trees, and feel like I can hear nature whispering sometimes. I love the idea of joyous, impromptu celebration.

Calling yourself a witch is more about 'owning' the word rather than what you really do, though. Which is hard because firstly it has negative connotations in the dominant ideology, and secondly, most nowadays aren't formally initiated by a coven. I don't think it matters to me either way; I'm comfortable not using it. But I have to admit I do like it when others are bold about it, it's like taking back control of language and life.
 

Kalisti

I consider myself to be a witch, and my husband doubly thinks so :D "Put your hands on me, I hurt here." I kinda think that's a sort of placebo effect for him, though, I don't fancy myself much of a healer at the present time.

Divination is my strongest suit, has been since I was a practicing Christian, but to me it's much more than that. I have an Animistic bend rather than a Wicca/Trad Witchcraft/High Magick approach, and I don't do much spellwork. It's more about connecting to Spirit, both earth based and others, and I can find "soul" in almost anything. I can sense spirits pretty well, but communicating is something I'm still working on. I work with my ancestors, I have one that is protective of me and watches over me. Actually, I commune more than I "work" with them, I don't involve them in any spell work when I do use spells.

For me, it's about the earth, interconnectivity, and communing with those who are difficult to percieve.
 

Tanga

...Calling yourself a witch is more about 'owning' the word rather than what you really do, though. Which is hard because firstly it has negative connotations in the dominant ideology, and secondly, most nowadays aren't formally initiated by a coven.

The initiation part - is only if you're Wiccan. "Traditionally" - one couldn't be Wiccan without being initiated into a coven. Part of the definition of it, was to work within a group and of course use the structure of Wicca.

But one can call themselves a Witch. (A Wiccan is a Witch, but a Witch is not necessarily Wiccan - Lol. And some Wiccans do not identify as Witches. There are blurred definitions on exactly what it includes).
Now, solitary's can call themselves Wiccan (since there is now access to reading material
which details what that is) - but within the community, people will still ask you if you're initiated or not.
It's a different ball game to be/have been in a coven/structured group and gone through the training experience.

Ofcourse, there are other esoteric traditions also with initiation structures (I've little knowledge/experience of these so can't comment).


And in my view "Witch" doesn't necessarily mean covering all the bases of what a "Witch" might be seen to entail. As with everything - individuals all have their specialism, as well as stuff that they never do/think about. (variety is the spice of life - as well as a great building block for a mostly gregarious nature, to connect with others and learn and grow from sharing different skills/ideas).
And - using the label "Witch" it's definitely also about "owning" the idea of the wise woman/man who is sensitised to the rhythms of the natural world and/or seeking/living with a creative use of ones intuitive side. Re-claiming and polishing up the tarnished image of "Witch" - as we know it. :)
 

Papa Tango

My first wife. I never saw her fly about on a broom or anything of that nature--but she often left bubbling pots of vile concoctions on the stove and muttered curses at myself and the kids for 'spoiling her life'...

My recently departed mother-in-law (dead at 100 years old) lived with us until her timely demise in March. What a witch she was. She was first generation Italian-American, and regularly gave us the 'malocchio' or evil eye. She also regularly tried to conjure up St. Anthony in her bedroom. Fortunately, she was not successful.

The label witch derives from the Old English word 'wicce.' This term has been appropriated to a number of anti-Christian beliefs and practices--but at the end of the day really means a number of beliefs that one holds a power--personally or externally--to manifest some sort of inner quality of spiritual 'gift' to influence individual or social reality, perception, or outcome--and some sort of structure to accomplish that within.

Over the course of my surprisingly long (given my own habits) life, I have known quite a few women who have claimed an affinity or empowerment to primarily Wiccan belief, spirituality, and practice. Over half were self-deluding posers who found identity and purpose in such device. Others were truly enlightened persons, who in a different context might aptly be described as "old souls." The latter was a pleasure and adventure in knowing.

I feel that in the 21st Century, the term witch is dated and fraught with too much historic and social baggage. Realistically it is derogatory, as I aptly demonstrated in my opening paragraphs. Spirituality and its manifestation takes many forms. Some people call my wife a witch. I call her a 'root doctor' in good humor. Rather, she is a naturopath and homeopath that has the ability to see deeply into people and their relation to their own reality and influence that.

Perhaps this is the final truth in what a witch is... :thumbsup:
 

hermit-IX

^ok we can all go home now

one thing i'd like elaboration on, because that's kind of where i'm stuck at and why i made this post is your comment on a poser and an old soul. can you elaborate on how you'd spot the difference?
 

Papa Tango

Hermit, this is a most difficult question--and in this particular forum venue can be inflammatory by its very nature. But, the irascible curmudgeon that I am--I will give it a go!

The term 'poser' does not necessarily imply or impugn someone that is involved with something nefarious. Often it is quite benign, and unintended. Rather, we all seek to find some cohort or identity group/affinity in which we are welcomed, accepted, and given a sense of importance. This happens in Christian groups, other religious and theosophic belief groups, class based groups, and 'specialization' groups in which members espouse a number of tenets of belonging. It happens right here in this forum. This is basic sociology and social psychology.

Let's get to a very controversial point in all of this. Women across cultures have been marginalized, disenfranchised, and socially diminished--and abused as a result of this framework. Finding identity, power, privilege, and prestige can be difficult. Finding an identity group that 'promises' and lends both authority and hierarchy in belonging is an almost sacred thing to personhood. It should not be that way, but I have not made the 'rules' so my complaint about this merely echoes what should be. The most milquetoast manifestations of this search may be found in 'ladies societies' and 'garden clubs.'

Let's also be honest. The desire to manifest greed, avarice, and to hold under ones thrall others is not unique to the male patriarchal society. How many "Madam Somethingortheother" have extracted influence or wealth from seekers of finding a path to not only enlightenment--but moreover solutions to the pressing and emergent issues in their lives. Many of those issues ones that could and should be avoided by more impassionate critical thinking. Start thinking "Psychic Network" type of things. How many have preyed upon the hurt, lonely, confused, and gullible to their own gain, ego, or self-aggrandizement?

I could write an entire peer reviewed monograph on this--and cite dozens of studies and measures. But let's get to the other side of the equation. We understand that at the most basic level, women are innate 'empathisers' who feel and cognitively understand emotions on a deeper level. Some can manifest a profound spirituality with this--old soul to one side--that is an honest and real demonstration of what is human and spiritual understandings and advancement. Far too many are as dense as Osmium--and sacrifice self worth and value in a desire to be 'needed.' In this, there is a difference. One that can change lives and encourage human cognitive and spiritual growth.

Get what I mean? Religious and spiritual affinity are both paths to this ability. Ultimately they are little more than a mechanism in which to express it--whether male, female, or other. At the end of the day (as the hackneyed phrase goes) is something called discernment. How to discriminate? The reality is that after a fashion EVERYONE will ultimately tell you who they are. Can you or are your prepared to hear them? The true growth of the human being experiencing this phase of being human is to learn the difference and recognize the nuances. Those who do not are consigned to repeating the mistakes and misjudgements of the past--be manipulated--and left wondering why nothing changes...
 

hermit-IX

thank you. you've described a witch beautifully.
like you suggested in your first post, a witch has a negative connotation.
but to me witches have the purest of souls. it's like a requirement for me.
 

Tanga

^ok we can all go home now

one thing i'd like elaboration on, because that's kind of where i'm stuck at and why i made this post is your comment on a poser and an old soul. can you elaborate on how you'd spot the difference?

There's no formula to apply to know (well maybe when one is as experienced as Papa Tango - or my Mum - you might be able to just "read it in the aura" :) ) - as Papa Tango says - you find that out over time.


I feel that in the 21st Century, the term witch is dated and fraught with too much historic and social baggage. Realistically it is derogatory, as I aptly demonstrated in my opening paragraphs.

Yes - and deeply ingrained in most cultures as so.


Spirituality and its manifestation takes many forms. Some people call my wife a witch. I call her a 'root doctor' in good humor. Rather, she is a naturopath and homeopath that has the ability to see deeply into people and their relation to their own reality and influence that.

Perhaps this is the final truth in what a witch is...

Yes - indeed.



The Magic Circle - by John William Waterhouse:
http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/waterhouse-the-magic-circle-n01572
http://www.johnwilliamwaterhouse.com/pictures/magic-circle-1886/

:) :)


...but to me witches have the purest of souls. it's like a requirement for me.

...well - "purest of souls" could be a whole new debate. :) But I get the essence of what you mean.